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Bosnian Muslims flock into capital for reopening of historic mosque

But security is tight because memories of the old Islamic era still beset many Christians

General view of Ferhadija mosque during its opening ceremony in Banja Luka, May 7, 2016. Thousands flocked to the capital of Bosnia's Serb statelet on Saturday for the reopening of a historic mosque destroyed during wartime, a ceremony seen as encouraging religious tolerance among deeply divided communities.

Thousands of Muslims flocked to the capital of Bosnia’s Serb region on Saturday (May 7) for the reopening of a historic mosque destroyed during wartime, a ceremony seen as encouraging religious tolerance among deeply divided communities.

Twenty years after the devastating war between its Muslim Bosniaks, Orthodox Serbs and Catholic Croats, Bosnia remains split along ethnic lines, with rival groups blocking reconciliation and reform needed to join the European Union.

The return of Muslim believers to the rebuilt Ferhadija mosque in the largely Serb city of Banja Luka, capital of Bosnia’s autonomous Serb Republic, offered hope for change to many, although some were more cautious.

Amid tight security, about 1,000 police officers patrolled the streets as buses arrived with Muslims from across the country. Traffic was barred from the city center and alcohol banned.

Turkey’s outgoing Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, whose country contributed to the cost of rebuilding, reopened the mosque in front of a congregation of up to 10,000, saying the new building sent a message of peace.

This article continues at [Religion News] Historic Bosnian mosque reopens in move toward reconciliation

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