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The Democrats: Why they're heavy on marches, but light on vote turnout

It's because their huge urban mass is easily assembled, while the GOP support spreads wide

The Democrats: Why they're heavy on marches, but light on vote turnout

The Senate map in 2018 is brutal for Democrats. If Democrats want to get their mojo back, they’re going to need to do more than get a small minority of voters to turn out for a march. They’re going to need to get back some of those rural votes.

But there are a lot of small towns in America, and those small towns are redder than ever, as Sean Trende and David Byler wrote on the RealClear Politics website. Effectively, the Democratic coalition has self-gerrymandered into a small number of places where they can turn out an impressive number of feet on the ground, but not enough votes to win the House. Certainly not enough to win the Senate or the Electoral College, which both favor sparsely populated states and discount the increasingly dense parts of the nation.

The Senate map in 2018 is brutal for Democrats. If Democrats want to get their mojo back, they’re going to need to do more than get a small minority of voters to turn out for a march. They’re going to need to get back some of those rural votes.

To do that, they’re probably going to have to let go of the most soul-satisfying, brain-melting political theory of the last two decades: that Democrats are inevitably the Party of the Future, guaranteed ownership of the future by an emerging Democratic majority in minority-white America. This theory underlay a lot of Barack Obama’s presidency, and Hillary Clinton’s campaign. With President Donald Trump’s inauguration, we saw the results.

Why was this such a bad theory? Let me count the ways:

This article continues at [Denver Post] The Democrats’ rise is far from inevitable

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