Ken Blackwell: Democrats risk civil war by ratcheting up the rhetoric

Ken Blackwell: Democrats risk civil war by ratcheting up the rhetoric

The Culture

Who would have guessed that the proper response to white supremacists marching in Charlottesville was to encourage election fraud? At least, that’s the position taken by congressional Democrats. They apparently have forgotten the lessons of their party’s Jim Crow laws, poll taxes and the like.

The good news out of Charlottesville is how few people turned out for a supposedly national rally and the lack of public support for neo-Nazis and their ilk. The marchers discredited themselves, but played the victim card after left-wing protestors turned to violence.

We all know America is not perfect. But thankfully our country is very different today from what it was 50 or 100 years ago.

Rather than emphasize the positive, Democratic lawmakers seek political advantage. And perhaps none more than Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. He desperately wants to displace Sen. Mitch McConnell as Majority Leader and probably has the White House in his sights.

So, after Charlottesville, Sen. Schumer declared that “we need more than just words — we also need action.” What might that be? “It’s time to end the assault on voting rights,” meaning get rid of the Election Integrity Commission, on which I serve.

And if the president doesn’t do so, Democrats will attempt to attach an amendment to a “must-pass” piece of legislation, Sen. Schumer threatened. Of course, for that tactic to succeed, some Republicans would have to abandon their party.

The Election Integrity Commission Isn’t the Problem

Sen. Schumer’s demand is partisan politics at its most pure. The Commission is advisory and has no power to affect anyone’s voting rights. It cannot cancel one registration. It cannot order any state to do anything. All it can do is gather information, analyze issues and propose solutions.

This article continues at [Stream.org] The Left’s Uncivil War

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