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Poll: Swing-state voters want the government out of school bathrooms

Three battleground states reject public schools being forced to impose transgender rules

Museum manager Jeff Bell adheres informative backing to gender neutral public bathroom signs in Durham, N.C. on May 10

Voters in three major battleground states are sharply divided over whether transgender people should be allowed to use the public bathroom corresponding to their gender identity, according to the results of a Quinnipiac University survey on national issues released Thursday, with polling in Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania.

But they're all largely opposed to a mandate requiring public schools to allow transgender students to use the bathroom or locker room matching their gender identity. The White House last month issued a directive to all public school districts notifying them that they must allow students to use the bathroom corresponding to their gender identity, noting that states that do not comply with the administration's interpretation of Title IX risk getting sued or losing federal funding.

In Florida, 48 percent of voters say transgender people should be able to use the facilities corresponding with their gender identity, while 44 percent said they should not. Fifty-four percent said they would oppose any rule requiring enforcement of that rule in public schools, with to 37 percent in favor of such a rule.

Among registered voters in Ohio, 43 percent said transgender people should be able to use the corresponding bathroom or facility of their choice, while a plurality of 48 percent said they should not be allowed to do so. More than half, 55 percent to 36 percent, said they would oppose public schools being required to enforce any rule.

This article continues at [Politico] Swing-state voters: Keep government out of school bathrooms

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