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The 'women's strike' proved a huge flop because victimhood is dieing

Causes that try to divide society, rather than unite it, are increasingly doomed to fail

The 'women's strike' proved a huge flop because victimhood is dieing

Those participating in yesterday’s “strike” — the international “Day without a Woman” — rode a wave of renewed feminist momentum that has swept the country in the wake of January’s women’s marches. In fact, the U.S. iteration of the women’s strike was orchestrated by the very same group of women that planned the vulgar and sometimes violent protests staged in Washington the day after President Donald Trump’s inauguration.

But the movement’s undeniable momentum looks much less promising when one considers its rhetoric, which suggests that their effort is ultimately doomed to fail. The rhetoric reveals a feminist crusade hampered by a progressive view of society that divides people into interest groups united only by their pervasive belief that they are all being persecuted.

In early February, several of the strike’s organizers — most of whom are humanities professors — published an op-ed in The Guardian to articulate the principles of the ongoing feminist opposition to President Trump. The column’s most striking feature was its saturation with victim mentality — a view of women and minority groups as permanently trapped in the clutches of extensive societal ills. It also dripped with identity politics, particularly when it defined violence against women quite expansively as

the violence of the market, of debt, of capitalist property relations, and of the state; the violence of discriminatory policies against lesbian, trans and queer women; the violence of state criminalization of migratory movements; the violence of mass incarceration; and the institutional violence against women’s bodies through abortion bans and lack of access to free healthcare and free abortion.

This tendency toward melodrama was also evident when a rock singer who performed at January’s women’s march defined feminism as “a fight for all of our mothers and our sisters (and our proverbial siblings who identify as non-binary), especially the ones who do not have the privilege our culture affords wealthy, white, cisgender women.”

This article continues at [National Review] '‘Day without a Woman’: Fake feminism, and doomed to failure

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