[Foster] Pagan festival Samhain may now be dead but Halloween has risen up from its ashes

[Foster] Pagan festival Samhain may now be dead but Halloween has risen up from its ashes

Opinion
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[Charisma News] Suddenly, in front of me stood a man wearing a grotesque mask and holding a bloody knife—a disconcerting sight, to say the least. Across the room hung an array of “Hail Satan” T-shirts and other demonic regalia. Nearby was a booth containing “spooky baby” costumes.

VIDEO: [History Channel] Documentary on the true origins of Halloween


It was the 40th anniversary celebration of the release of the initial Halloween film, and as one of the original actors, I was there to sign autographs and to hand out my autobiography (Love Hunger) in hopes that the Lord would use it to save some. The man standing in front of me was the actor who had played the gruesome murderer, Michael Myers, in 10 of the 11 Halloween films.

During breaks, I was able to talk with many of the exhibitors and was surprised to find them exceedingly friendly. One young lady, dressed as a zombie, told me that horror fans were the kindest and nicest people she had ever met.

On the spot, I had to relearn the lesson that as believers, we must be careful to separate who people are from what they do. After all, weren’t we all once blind to the horrors of darkness and the unequaled glory of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ?

According to History.com, the celebration of Halloween originated with the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain, when people would light bonfires, wear costumes to ward off ghosts and tell each other’s fortunes. It was believed by the Celts and their Druid priests that on Oct. 31, the boundary between the living and the dead became blurred and as a result, the ghosts of the dead returned to earth. This focus on death and occult practices, such as divination and communication with the dead (necromancy), are practiced to this very day.

Beginning in the 1st century A.D. during the 400-year Roman occupation of Ireland and the British Isles, this Celtic festival was merged with the Roman worship of the goddess Pomona and their commemoration of the passing of the dead. Over the years, trick-or-treating, jack-o-lanterns and the wearing of costumes were added.

In the seventh century, Pope Boniface IV created “All Martyrs’ Day,” and in the eighth century, Pope Gregory III designated Nov. 1 as a time to honor Christian martyrs and saints (“All Saints’ Day”). Later switched to Nov. 2, this festival included bonfires, parades and dressing in costumes as saints, angels and devils. The evening before (“All Hallows’ Eve”) eventually became known as Halloween.

This article continues at [Charisma News] Homosexual-Turned-Pastor: What Do We Do With Halloween?

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