Last of the mammoths: Wrangell Island remains show sudden but surprisingly recent demise

Last of the mammoths: Wrangell Island remains show sudden but surprisingly recent demise

The Culture
Print Friendly, PDF & Email
[UK Daily Mail] The last of the woolly mammoths appear to have lived on an island in the Arctic and survived for 7,000 years longer than those on the mainland.

VIDEO: [Origins Explained] Well-preserved animal remains of great antiquity are not unusual. [Nov. 16, 2017]


Researchers suggested the prehistoric beasts were separated as the land masses moved around, and extinction moved more slowly on the island.

They lived on Wrangel Island, which is to the north of where Russia and Alaska come close to meeting.

Groups of the mammals on the continent contain evidence of DNA mutations as they approached extinction, but these are less apparent in the Wrangel Island fossils.

Scientists have found they were wiped out suddenly about 4,000 years ago, likely by a combination of humans arriving, extremely cold weather, and deteriorating drinking water quality.

Researchers at the University of Helsinki and Tübingen and the Russian Academy of Sciences said a combination of factors likely led to the later mammoths’ demise.

A combination of factors is believed to have sealed the ancient giants’ fate including their location on the isolated island, exposure to extreme weather events and even the introduction of prehistoric humans to the island.

Mammoths were widespread across most of the Northern hemisphere from Spain to Alaska during the last ice age, around 100,000 to 15,000 years ago.

This article continues at [UK Daily Mail] Mammoths lived as recently as 4,000 years ago in Canadian Arctic

Leave a Reply

Check Also
[Milke/MacPherson] Private, home school, saving Alberta taxpayers millions
[Milke / MacPherson] Private, home school, saving Alberta taxpayers millions
[TheChristians.com] Question: If you could design an education system with accessible school choices for all ...