[Richard Bastien] Weasel words and how multiculturalism used as weapon

[Richard Bastien] Weasel words and how multiculturalism used as weapon

Opinion
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[Convivium] The word “multiculturalism” now has two very different meanings.

VIDEO: [CBC] Barbara Kay talks about the limits of multiculturalism in Canada. [Jul 10, 2018]


First, it can refer to the fact that a society is made up of linguistically and religiously distinctive groups that, despite their differences, share in a common cultural heritage. Canada is a good example: its population until recently was largely made up of French-speaking Catholics and English-speaking Protestants.

The same could be said of Switzerland, whose population is divided into three language groups (German, French and Italian) and two religious traditions (Catholic and Protestant). In both countries, regional cultural differences co-exist with certain common values that result in a national identity, e.g. limited government, rule of law, basic human rights, entrepreneurship, equality of opportunities, subsidiarity. Thus, unity exists within diversity. Differences are maintained around a common moral and civil core.

But that is not how multiculturalism is generally understood nowadays. Indeed, over the past few decades, multiculturalism has become a weapon in the service of identity politics, i.e. the shaping of politics around the particular interests of various racial, religious, sexual, ethnic or cultural groups.

Understood in this sense, multiculturalism has no use for “national unity,” and even less for the notion of universal brotherhood. As Heather MacDonald argues in The Diversity Delusion, we now live in a world where “human beings are defined by their skin colo[u]r, sex, and sexual preference.” Loyalty is thus primarily linked to race, ethnicity, gender or sexual orientation.

This article continues at [Convivium] The weaponization of multiculturalism

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