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America's glaring contradiction regarding doctor-assisted suicide

By June 25% of US will be subject to state-sanctioned killing, says Christopher White

In 2015, almost thirty American states considered various forms of legislation that would legalize the practice of doctor-assisted suicide, and a similar total is expected by the end of 2016. When California’s new law takes effect in June, a quarter of the U.S. population will live in areas where the practice is permitted.

The National Center for Health Statistics recently announced that suicide rates in the United States are at a thirty-year high, up 24 percent since 1994, making it now the tenth leading cause of death in the country. Experts were quick to identify the spike as a public health crisis, and efforts launched to curtail it are both noble and necessary.

Alas, there’s a glaring contradiction in the fact they come at a time when the country is simultaneously embarking on a nationwide campaign to legalize physician-assisted suicide.

In 2015, almost thirty states considered various forms of legislation that would legalize the practice of doctor-assisted suicide, and a similar total is expected by the end of 2016.

While the majority of these efforts have failed, in October 2015 California’s Governor Jerry Brown signed into law a bill to sanction the practice in his state and, when it takes effect in June, it will place a quarter of the U.S. population in areas where the practice is legal.

It’s long been observed that the law serves as a powerful teacher. By allowing physician-assisted suicide in our legal code, we send a message that suicide is permissible, even desirable. It’s disingenuous for society to claim that suicide is a tragedy and rising rates are alarming, while at the same time carving out an exception in certain situations.

This article continues at [Cruxnow] Are Americans flirting with hypocrisy on suicide?

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